Half of all AF due to avoidable risk factors

HeartHawk
By HeartHawk Latest Reply 2011-04-14 22:22:37 -0500
Started 2011-03-30 10:56:05 -0500

We have many community members with atrial fibrillation. I just posted an article with a new study citing that half of Afib risk factors are modifiable and encourage all those concerned to read it and comment/asl questions here!

Hereis a link to the article

http://www.heartconnect.com/news-articles/139...

Interesting and another opportunity to practice Informed, Self-directed, Healthcare (ISH)!

HH


8 replies

re1ndeer
re1ndeer 2011-03-30 13:51:34 -0500 Report

I have diabetes, and when I was diagnosed almost 5 years ago, I was given the drug Avandia. I was only on it a short time (went on to insulin). Since now in the news they are claiming this drug causes heart attack and strokes. I wonder if this caused my Afib. back then. I can't be sure, but I still wonder.

HeartHawk
HeartHawk 2011-03-31 00:35:44 -0500 Report

re1ndeer,

I would postulate that anything that affects heart and coronary artery performance might affect afib. I know lawyers are having a field day suing GlaxoSmithKline over Avandia claims. They have already agreed to pay out over $60 million to settle about 700 claims.

HH

Perplexed
Perplexed 2011-04-11 08:17:04 -0500 Report

And do ANY of the patients receive much of the settlement(s) in the class action cases? I know the attorneys make mucho bucks on them but I wonder about the patients?

One of the men my husband worked with took part in an asbestos class action suite. It cost HIM at least a day off work, a 2 hour drive one way to "their" doctor, etc. and in the end, after the settlement he received $64.

I sat in on a settlement where a man sued for the death of his wife due to mesothelioma claiming she was exposed to asbestos from washing his clothes. (The asbestos on his clothes didn't "get" him, but it did his wife??) and he was awarded some $300. I was waiting my turn for my mother's affairs and wasn't involved in the suit myself.

We were invited to take part in a class action suit against John Hancock insurance and some other that I don't even remember and my husband refused to take part in it. He saw no sense in wasting his time making a bunch of attorneys richer.

HeartHawk
HeartHawk 2011-04-11 23:21:33 -0500 Report

Perplexed,

Here is the dirty little secret of how this works. Unscrupulous attorneys run ads looking to attract as many potential victims as possible. This creates pressure on the accused company to settle and effectively eliminate future claims from teh affected class (they all have to sign release forms).

The attorneys do not really care how much the victims get. They simply want to "up the ante" and get a quick settlement and take their 33% plus expenses - and of course they "pad" the expenses.

So, suppose they round up 1000 victims for a class action suit and approach the company who decides to pay $10 million to make it go away. The attorneys take their 33% ($3.33 million) and add in perhaps another $1.7 miilion in "expenses" leaving $5 million to be divided among 1000 victims. The victims each get a grand total of $5000 for their effort, pain, and suffering.

What a racket!

HH

Perplexed
Perplexed 2011-04-11 23:42:18 -0500 Report

Yeah, and you are probably being generous in estimating that the victims get $5000. Its all in the numbers. The more the merrier, makes the lawyers just that much richer. I thought lawyers were allowed 40%. Poor souls only get 33%, eh. Plus expenses either way, of course.

HeartHawk
HeartHawk 2011-04-12 23:52:14 -0500 Report

Perplexed,

Actually, the number is whatever the lawyers negotiate. 33% is the floor. It can be higher!

HH

Perplexed
Perplexed 2011-04-13 08:40:33 -0500 Report

I guess I was under the impression of the 40% because at the time of my husband having to file for disability retirement due to his back after his 3rd surgery and I was following an SSDI support website the disability lawyers were restricted to 40%. That was why it almost always takes 2 years to get approval. If you file thru a lawyer too soon they are restricted to no more than 40% of any disability backpay allowed.

HeartHawk
HeartHawk 2011-04-14 22:22:37 -0500 Report

Perplexed,

Yes, there may be some government regulations that address this. Not a lawyer but hang around a few. You are probably better informed on this type of class action!

HH