Horror Stories in Cardiology: How About a Stent with That Order?

HeartHawk
By HeartHawk Latest Reply 2011-03-13 22:52:13 -0500
Started 2011-03-02 22:52:19 -0600

I know, it is never pleasant, but it is often the mistakes and "horror stories" that provide the best lessons.

I just posted an article about the Maryland Legislature looking at new rules for stenting after an expose' on unnecessary stents.

http://www.theheart.org/article/1193569.do?ut...

Has our community experienced any cardiological "horror stories?" Everything from docs with bad "bedside manner" to outright screw-ups is fair game. What happened to you?! Your story may save someone else a lot of pain!

HH


5 replies

cantjoinnonames
cantjoinnonames 2011-03-04 15:00:09 -0600 Report

I may have had a worst screw-up then I did if after breaking an ankle and in the emergency room insisted on haveing my cardiologist contacted that I wanted to see him before surgury, he was very prompt in seeing me, had in fact already conffered with the orthapedic surgen, I was to stay on my plavix and asprin. The next day a nurse came into my room to give me a belly shot, I refused it telling them I wanted to talk to my Dr. that I was to have plavix not anything else to keep my blood from cloting, The RN charge nurse came in my room 15 min. latter told me Dr said to give me the shot and the plavix, needless to say my insissions blead so bad it soaked the boot and bed, at this point the nurses on duty didn't like me questioning procedure so they didn't change my dressings or the bed pillow my leg was on, they would help me up to the bathroom, this was all, when my cardiologist made rounds the 2nd belly shot they had gave me was the last one, he wasn't aware of what the orthapedic surgen had done.

HeartHawk
HeartHawk 2011-03-05 23:11:09 -0600 Report

cantjoin,

(Wow, that's a heck of a nickname). This is typical of some arrogant medical professionals who perform like bureaucrats (people who work by fixed routine without exercising intelligent thought). That is why it is SO important to become knowledgeable about your unique medical condition.

I always laugh when I see he look on the faces pf docs and nurses when I challenge their fixed routine with sound logic. It is almost like they freeze. But, you need facts in order to stand your ground.

Thanks for the insightful experience!

HH

HeartHawk
HeartHawk 2011-03-03 22:15:58 -0600 Report

Lenny,

Thanks for the input. Isn't it curious that after all these years and all the technological advances it is the simple stuff like surgical cleanliness that still causes problems!

HH

LennyDenny
LennyDenny 2011-03-03 13:15:06 -0600 Report

Hey HH - Here's one for you. The day I had my heart attack I had a heart cath done, they put in 2 stents. I spent the next 12 days in intensive care. While there they told me that I had a staff infection in the blood. they say that they did not clean the cath area enough when they did my heart cath. Because of this I went home after 14 days in the hospital with a pic line in my arm and need IV antibotics for the next month at home. I told them that it was because of them I'm still alive and you have to take the good with the bad. I did have a nurse or two that were screw ups but on the hole I feel the care I was given was great.
Denny

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